Category Archives: Author interviews

Meet author Josie Montano

Josie Montano is an award-winning author, and has just released her sixtieth book in over Josie 120 years within the publishing industry. She has been internationally published, translated into Italian, and writes under two pseudonyms – fiction under the name of Montano, and resources on Autism under the name Santomauro.

Josie also dabbles in freelance having had a variety of differing articles and regular columns published. Her play ‘The Great Escape, Italian Style’ trod the boards at the Gympie Rush Festival. She has contributed to technical handbooks, narrative scripts as well as co-edited an international journal. She has been short-listed for a variety of literary awards and acquired many achievements over the years. These include a residency with the May Gibbs Children’s Literature Trust, and she has been a presenter with ‘Out of the Box’.

She grew up in rural Australia within a strong Italian community. From the age of nine, she self-published her own books for borrowing at the school library, and received her first rejection letter from Golden Books when she was thirteen.

 What is the title of your latest book?

STUFF THEY DON’T TEACH YOU AT SCHOOL. Everything from acne, after-parties andJosie 2 alcohol to wannabes, waxing and zits – this is a thorough A to Z dictionary handbook for teens full of the stuff that really counts but doesn’t get a mention at school.

 What are the most challenging aspects of being a writer? And the most rewarding?

Challenging: making deadlines! Putting your work out there for people to judge, criticise or/and love.

Rewarding:  seeing your labour of love in book form, holding that first copy in print, having readers love your work – it’s all worth it!

 What is your top tip for an aspiring writer?

Keep writing, EVERY DAY! Rub shoulders, network, attend conferences, workshops, writing courses etc, to hone your craft. Don’t assume you ‘know it all.’ Even after 60 published works I am always refining and learning.

 What are you working on at the moment?

Josie cartoonI always have a few pots, or should I say stories, on the boil. I have been contracted for three upcoming picture books and, a total contrast, I am also on a deadline for a contracted, non-fiction, resource on Autism and relationships.

 What do you like to read?

I can vary from a soppy trashy romance, a children’s book, a classic, to a soap magazine. I recently created a ‘Classics’ bookclub so we can read the classics eg: Brontes, Jane Austin, Ernest Hemingway etc.

 Where can readers find you?

http://www.booksbyjosie.com.au

https://www.facebook.com/Josie-Montano-Author-88023619410/

 

 

 

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Meet author Adam Zorzi

Adam was born in Venice, but educated in New York City and continues to live there. His passion is travel and he counts himself lucky to have a job that gives him that opportunity. He writes non-fiction for work – proposals, reports, and studies.  He started writing fiction about 5 years ago to entertain himself, took a creative writing class, and joined a writers’ group when he felt he had something to share. That made writing fiction even more fun and challenging for him. He takes every advantage of living in NYC with its concerts, art, and films. People-watching, he says, is a great source of inspiration.

What is the title of your latest book? adam 2

Auld Acquaintances (234 pages, Solstice Publishing, $16.99) is my first holiday paranormal romance. Set in Williamsburg, Virginia, a Colonial ghost who discovered her husband’s betrayal at a New Year’s Eve party, and promptly hurled herself out of her bedroom window, tries to stop the wedding of a contemporary couple who plan to wed on New Year’s Eve. She has reason to believe the groom is a cad. The couple, who are both university professors, refuse to believe a ghost could be the one who is interfering with their plans by stealing jewelry, destroying bridal party gowns, and poisoning a wedding guest. They believe someone in their circle of friends and family and colleagues is playing a cruel practical joke. They don’t really doubt each other, but someone is standing between them and marriage. Because it’s romance, there’s a happy ever after ending.

Your readers might find some of the holiday customs sound familiar. Williamsburg was established as part of England’s Virginia Colony in 1623 and is home to the College of William & Mary—the second oldest college in the United States—named for King William III and Queen Mary II. The historic colonial district of Williamsburg has been preserved as it was during its pre-Revolutionary War period and attracts a large number of visitors adam 4during the holiday season for colonial music, decorations, and activities.

I also have a short story Low Country Boil in the latest volume (No. 6) of the Solstice Publishing horror anthology Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep. It’s not gory horror. It’s more what if? What if persons entrusted to protect the county don’t, and what are the consequences? The story follows a law enforcement transplant from Maine to a county in the southern United States and how adjusting to her new environment isn’t great for maintaining law and order.

What are the most challenging aspects of being a writer? And the most rewarding?

 I’ll start with the most rewarding. Freedom of expression. No matter what is going on in the world or household, I create a world, populate it with characters I find interesting, and tell a story that intrigues me and sometimes quietly draws attention to issues important to me. I enjoy researching backgrounds for settings and characters and discover all kinds of new and often irrelevant information. It’s an education. Most importantly to me, it’s fun. I truly enjoy it.

As for challenges, I sometimes write myself into a corner. I don’t plot meticulously beforehand so I have to reroute the story. There are also times when I know exactly what I want to happen and it simply doesn’t read properly on the page. I keep writing that scene until it flows and move on.

 What is your top tip for an aspiring writer?

 Write. Write anything. Get used to expressing yourself on the page. Try different word counts— 5,000 words tells a different story than 1,000. Write the same story from different points of view (POV). Try a new genre. Don’t wait for an assignment. Write letters to the editor of a publication about a story or a letter to fictional characters.

You can’t talk/sell yourself into being an author. You have to have something on pages for an editor, agent, publisher, reading group to read.

What are you working on at the moment?adam 3

A paranormal beach read. I never expected to be a paranormal writer, but my characters usually have an eternal love. If one of them dies, it’s reasonable to me that they would try to reunite.

I’m also working on a four-part family saga that isn’t paranormal. It’s set in places I enjoy visiting and want to create characters who live there. One family member works in the Orkney Islands and another in Mallorca.

What do you like to read?

Autobiographies. I like hearing how a person tells their life story. I’m not interested in any particular industry. I’ve read books by sailors, actors, singers, business leaders, scientists, and political leaders. I rarely read biographies because someone else tells the story often from a scholarly or salacious POV.

I also read mystery and suspense. Right now, I’m enjoying Nordic crime series. One, by Kati Hekkapelto, is set in Finland and another, by Ragnar Jonasson is set in Iceland.

 Where can readers find you?

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Meet author Simon Fairbanks

I first met Simon when he and fellow authors from Birmingham, UK, came to give readings from their latest works at The Big Comfy Bookshop in my home city, Coventry. I had gone along to check out the shop as a potential venue for my own writers’ group and this seemed as good an opportunity as any. It was a very successful evening. Simon and his colleagues proved to be a great bunch, and the bookshop is a truly welcoming and atmospheric place in which to hold a writers’ group meeting. Simon 145kb

Simon is a fantasy author living in Birmingham. His first novel, The Sheriff, was released in March 2014. The following month, it was chosen to participate in the One Big Book Launch. The next book in the series, The Curse of Besti Bori, was released in October 2015.

His debut short story collection, Breadcrumbs, contains twenty-one short stories, including a new adventure starring the characters of The Sheriff.

Simon was also one of ten writers selected for the Ten To One project. Their collaborative efforts resulted in the novel Circ.

What is the title of your latest book? 

Simon 2 My most recent novel is The Curse Of Besti Bori. The jungle cloud of Besti Bori is in quarantine. An infection has consumed the cloud, turning its peaceful people into monstrous splicers. Now a team of archers watch over its borders, ensuring nothing enters and nothing leaves.
That is until Sheriff Baran visits for a routine inspection. His sky-horse is mysteriously drugged and he plummets into the darkness of the cursed jungle.
Now, Sheriff Shaula must return from her self-inflicted exile to lead a rescue mission into the most dangerous place in Nephos. Armed only  with  a team  of  warrior fairies,  Shaula  must  battle  her  way  through hordes of splicers to retrieve the stranded Baran. However, Shaula soon learns that splicers are not the only danger lurking in Besti Bori.

 What are the most challenging aspects of being a writer? And the most rewarding?

 The biggest challenge is finding the time and motivation to write, alongside family commitments, a full-time job and the temptation of Netflix!

The most rewarding moment is holding your printed novel in your hands, knowing that all those months of grafting, writing and editing are now contained in a neat little package adorned with your name. I love sliding my finished novels onto my bookshelf in between famous authors!

 What is your top tip for an aspiring writer? Simon 3

 I strongly recommend joining a writers’ group. I joined the Birmingham Writers’ Group in Autumn 2011. They helped me progress from a complete novice to a self-published novelist in less than three years – The Sheriff.

Writing is a solitary activity but you need camaraderie, accountability and feedback to stay motivated. An organised and supportive writers’ group is worth its weight in gold.

 What are you working on at the moment?

 I am currently editing my second short story collection, provisionally titled Breadcrumbs 2. I just need to write one more novella and the collection will be complete.

 What do you like to read?

 My three writing heroes are Terry Pratchett, Stephen King and Agatha Christie, thankfully three of the most prolific writers you can find! My favourite books of all time are His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman. I am very excited about his follow-up trilogy, The Book of Dust, which begins in October of this year. Generally, I read two books a month: one traditionally published and one self-published.

 Where can readers find you ?

NB: You can also find a short story by Simon in the Christmas anthology, Festive Treats, along with my short story, Mary’s Christmas. This is available as a free download from my Amazon Author page:  http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B00RVO1BHO

 

 

 

 

 

Meet author Salee Vidal Tadeo

 Salee 1Salee is a Lecturer of English Literature and Language in Norfolk, England.

Her first book is called, The Third Colour; a story about her youngest sister’s long battle for life, and eventual death.  For Salee, her sister’s story reignited the fire in her as a writer.

She incorporates her deep faith in God in all her writing because she believes that without God, she would not be able to write inspirational stories to share with the world.   

 

What is the title of your latest book?Salee 2

 

It’s called Sombre – The Incubus. It is about Ysabelle, a young girl who played Spirit of the Glass, a horror board game similar to Ouija. Little did she and her friends know that the spirit of the young man who answered their call on that dreamy night would become Ysabelle’s regular nightmare.

 

 

What are the most challenging aspects of being a writer? And the most rewarding?

The most challenging for me is keeping with a self-imposed minimum number of words to be written every day. The reality is there are days that I cannot write anything, not even a word because of many reasons, or I’d say excuses, for being a normal? human being (I put a question mark as I am not really sure if we, as writers, are normal because our brains are constantly working , i.e. buzzing  for plots, characters, twists and turns.)

Another reason for not keeping to my self- imposed rules is the reality that I am also a full-time lecturer. That does not need any elaboration, I believe. Teachers, like me, will definitely understand my state of mind and body at that.

The most rewarding is when I read a scene and feel exactly how my characters feel. That’s when I know that what I am trying to convey in my book is working.

All writers want to be published; that is the ultimate goal, so when you finally get that seal of approval from a publisher, you know that all your hard work has paid off.

A good review and excellent sales result add up to the joy of course.

 What is your top tip for an aspiring writer?

 What I always try to do is the reverse chronology. I begin the story with its end without revealing the climax, of course: a scene that could create a rhetorical question that will ignite the reader’s interest.

I know the word passion is overly used, but it is really the bottom line. It should be embedded in everything that we do. If there is passion, you know that you’re doing it right. It may not be good in other people’s standards and in a writer’s case this could mean a rejection, but always remember that beauty is in the eye of the beholder; you’ll find someone who will put his/her trust in you eventually. In my case, that someone is Solstice Publishing.

Prayers also play a big role in my life so I always pray for guidance. Believe it or not, but some parts of my book Sombre were manifested in dreams. The manuscript I am currently working on is also shown to me in a dream.

What are you working on at the moment?

 I am about to finish the first book for a trilogy. As mentioned above, the idea came from a dream. I was watching a film in my dream and the title was Heaven’s Archive.  I am going to use that as the series title. The first book is my own title, The River’s Ode (not from a dream, so it’s likely to change).

The River’s Ode is about a soldier’s wife who becomes bewildered after her husband has gone missing in action. She tries to find her husband by herself. She begins by going to the last place where she thinks he has disappeared.  Her feet lead her to a river tucked away behind rows of giant trees. Little does she know that that river holds all the answers to all the questions on her mind.

 What do you like to read?

My job requires me to do a lot of reading so I basically read everything; from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Othello and many more;  John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men;  George Orwells’s Animal Farm to books like A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness , The Savage by David Almond, Stone Cold by Robert Swindells.

However, my most favourite is any book based on a true story especially when it is about heavenly encounters. I am a fan of Mitch Albom, Leo Buscaglia and Jacky Newcomb.

 Where can readers find you?

 My website is www.english-matters.co.uk

 Book links at all Amazon sites: https://www.amazon.com/Sombre-Incubus-Salee-Vidal-Tadeo/dp/1625265921/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1503578920&sr=1-1&keywords=sombre+the+incubus        

 On Twitter: https://twitter.com/englishandbooks?lang=en-gb

GoodReads:https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16986661.Salee_Vidal_TadeoGoodReads:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/authorsaleevidaltadeo/?ref=bookmarks

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Meet Author KateMarie Collins

KateMarie Collins

 

KateMarie Collins is no stranger to this blog – she featured here on 2nd July when she talked about her work as the chief operating officer for the Solstice Publishing House. She is also an author  in her own right. Today she talks about her experience as a writer, and her latest book.

 

 

What is the title of your latest book?

My latest release is Consort of the Successor. It’s the sequel to Mark of theKate 4 Successor and focuses on one of the characters from that book, Talin. It’s about discovering who he is, his past, and what it means to stand next to someone who will eventually rule.

 What are the most challenging aspects of being a writer? And the most rewarding?

Rewarding? Being told that a story affected someone in some way. Made them think, cry, laugh, whatever. If I get an emotional reaction from a reader, I did my job.

Challenging would be making myself sit down and write. I let a lot of things get higher priority than they should. Marketing is a close second, Kate 3though.

 What is your top tip for an aspiring writer?

Don’t give up. If this is what you want to do, then go for it. The only difference between a published author and an unpublished one is that the first one hit send. They kept submitting until they got a contract. This job isn’t easy, and it’s not for everyone. You’re going to see months on end where your book doesn’t even sell one copy while you’re branding your name. You can’t do anything about those months. You just have to take a deep breath, let it go, and keep trying. This isn’t a get rich overnight type of career.

 Kate 2What are you working on at the moment?

Guarding Amber. It’s the follow-up to an urban fantasy novel I wrote in 2016 called Guarding Charon.

 

What do you like to read?

Fantasy. Have always loved the genre.

 

 

Where can readers find you?

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Meet author Susan Lynn Solomon.

Susan Lynn Solomon was formerly a Manhattan entertainment attorney and a contributing editor to the quarterly art magazine SunStorm Fine Art. She now lives in Niagara Falls, New York.

Suzy 1After moving north at the start of the millennium, she became a member of Just Buffalo Literary Center’s Writers Critique Group, and since 2007 many of her short stories have appeared in literary journals, including, Abigail Bender (awarded an Honorable Mention in Writers Journal’s short romance competition), Ginger Man, Elvira, The Memory Tree, Going Home, Yesterday’s Wings, and Sabbath (nominated for 2013 Best of the Net). A collection of her short stories, Voices In My Head, has been published by Solstice Publishing, and her latest short story, Smoker’s Lament is online in the journal Imitation Fruit.

Susan was a finalist in M&M’s Chanticleer’s Mystery & Mayhem Novel Contest, and a finalist for the 2016 Book Excellence Award. Her first Solstice Publishing novel, The Magic of Murder, has received rave reviews, as has Bella Vita, a short story that continues the adventures (and often missteps) of these characters.

What is the title of your latest book?

I am the author of the Emlyn Goode Mysteries. Well, at least the characters in the stories grudgingly allow me to take credit for creating them. Most days, though, I feel as if they’ve created me. I suppose that’s what happens when imaginary friends become as real as people I’ve known all my life. I invite them to my house for a play-date, supply a few toys (also provide a meal—Emlyn and her friends insist on being fed), then I sit back and make notes about what these people say and do.

The last time I had them over, I told them about a body discovered forty years ago in the woods below Lewiston—that’s a town just north of Niagara Falls. This is what they made out of what happened:Suzy 3

When Emlyn Goode’s mother returns to Niagara Falls for a high school reunion, so does murder. During the reunion, a woman’s body is found in the ladies room. Is this killing connected to the one that occurred 40 years before in the woods below the town of Lewiston? Harry Woodward, then a young police officer working his first murder case, suspected Emlyn’s mother of the crime, although there wasn’t enough evidence to arrest her.

Home from a year-long leave, Harry—now the Niagara Falls Chief of Detectives—together with Emlyn’s friend, Detective Roger Frey, investigates the latest killing. Distraught over indications her mother might have been involved in both murders, Emlyn, with her cohort, Rebecca Nurse, sets out to prove otherwise. But danger lurks in the shadows when amateurs—even ones with witchy skills—get involved with murder.

With my characters dictating, this scenario became the novel Dead Again.

What are the most challenging aspects of being a writer? And the most rewarding?

For me the most difficult thing—and it’s a horror—is staring at a blank page, praying for the muse to speak, and dreading that this time she won’t. It isn’t only when I’m ready to begin a new story that this fear rears its head. It might strike when I’m facing the next chapter of a story in progress. Recently, I panicked because of a silent muse. About a third of the way through writing the new Emlyn Goode novel, even my characters refused to speak to me. Stuck, I was certain the fun had ended. Never again would I have a story to write. To the annoyance of my family, I sulked for a week. Don’t laugh. A writer is the only thing I ever wanted to be. It’s who I am. The sulking ended when I woke one morning. Apparently the muse spoke to me while I slept. She told me to change the name of one of the characters that appears for the first time in this new book. Once I did this… What a joy! The words are flowing. Once again I’m a writer.

There are other challenges to writing, of course. Once finished, I want my story published. This means I’ve got to create a synopsis. 1,000, maybe 1,500 words, and, it has to be compelling. I hate this! If I could have told the story in 1,500 words, I wouldn’t have used 70,000 or more words to do it in the first place. Even now that Solstice Publishing is accepting my mysteries, when I submit a story I have to give them a tag-line. This means telling the essence of the story in one or two compelling sentences… aaargh! And the biggest challenge is still to come. Once a story is published, I want people to read it. This means promote, promote, promote… When Mrs. Price, my 11th grade English teacher, encouraged me to become a professional liar (what? Isn’t writing fiction actually the art of lying convincingly?), she forgot to tell me this thing I’ve grown to love, eventually becomes work.

Ah, but there are great rewards for all the work. I recall the thrill the day my first short story was accepted by a literary journal, Witches Gumbo. So I’ll never forget how that Suzy 4felt, I had the first pages framed. It hangs near the desk where I write. Other stories have been published over the years, and several of them have been nominated for awards and a few actually won. I feel the same thrill each time one of my stories is accepted. Still, the greatest thrill came the day I received an email saying Solstice Publishing had accepted my first Emlyn Goode Mystery novel, The Magic of Murder. After its release, I felt elated each day I looked at the Amazon website and saw the incredible reviews posted by those who’d read the novel. In spite of all the challenges (and yes, rejections while I learned my craft) so many years later I still thank Mrs. Price for encouraging me to write.

What is your top tip for an aspiring writer?

There are so many. Certainly, write, write, write. And read. Everything. Join a writers’ group, and take their critiques seriously. I remember walking into Just Buffalo Literary’s Writers Group more than 12 years ago. I’d finished a novel and, in my grandmother’s words, I thought I was a whole goddamit. Then the critiquing began. I might have felt insulted and walked out, but didn’t. I locked my ego in a vault, and listened to what the other writers said about each other’s work. In listening, I learned. Today, when I look at what I wrote years ago, I can’t believe how much that younger writer needed to grow.

Perhaps, though, my top tip would be to spend time on research. When I finished a first draft of Witches Gumbo, I showed it to my friend, Al. After reading it, the questions began. The story was set in a Louisiana bayou. Is this the way people there would speak? He asked whether this is what a house set in this place would look like. The story involved herbalism and a touch of “the old ways”. Is this what people practicing magic in a bayou would actually do? Even fiction has to ring true for the story and characters to be believable. I actually forgot to research one fact, and after the story was published a reader’s review mentioned what I’d missed.

What are you working on at the moment?

At present, I’m about 40,000 words into the next Emlyn Goode Mystery novel—this will be the third. Called Writing is Murder, it focuses on a writers group. One of my writers’ groups, actually, though the names are changed to protect… uh, me. It’s okay. The group members have given me permission to kill one of them. Or maybe more than one. We’ll see how blood thirsty I get. In this novel, it’s Halloween. Emlyn Goode and her writer friends do a ghost hunt in a house reputedly cursed in the 1820s by a Tuscarora brave. The eerie fun ends when they stumble over the body of a member of their group. This isn’t the first murder to take place in the Bennet House. When her lover, Detective Roger Frey is shot and Emlyn returns to the house searching for a clue to the shooter’s identity, will she become the next victim of the Tuscarora Curse?

Another Emlyn Goode Mystery is also in the works—this one a Christmas novelette I hope to have ready to submit for Solstice Publishing’s holiday anthology.

What do you like to read?

I read everything. My only requirements is that a story be beautifully written. The use of language, I mean. I want the words to almost be lyrical. I also want well-constructed scenes filled with believable characters. I want to care about the protagonist. I found all of this recently in Tea Obreht’s The Tiger’s Wife, A Manette Ansay’s River Angel, and in Blackbird Rising by Gary Earl Ross. I’ve also found it in recent books by A. B. Funkhauser and Maighread MacKay.

Of course, I’ll always come back to a good mystery. At eleven my mom gave me a Hercule Poirot story, and I was hooked. These days I’ve become enamoured of the missteps of Stephanie Plum in the Janet Evanovich series.

Where can readers find you?

There are presently three Emlyn Goode Mysteries readers can find on Amazon. Each has gotten rave reviews, and is a Readers’ Favorite 5-star pick.

The novels:

The Magic of Murder:

Dead Again: Suzy 2

 

Novelette:

Bella Vita: http://bookgoodies.com/a/B01I01WEWW

I can be found on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/susanlynnsolomon

 

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Meet author Molly V. Lovell

Molly 2

 

Molly’s debut novel will be published on August 25th . Here she describes what it is about, her love of character, and how she fits writing into her already hectic life. Seems writing whilst watching TV works for her!

 

 

What is the title of your latest book?

 My latest novel is titled A Sibling’s Dilemma. It’s my first novel so I’m pretty excitedMolly 1 about it. A Sibling’s Dilemma is a contemporary romance novel about a private detective, Cassie, her sister, Ellie, and a CEO named Edric. Edric’s kid brother goes missing so he hires Cassie to find him. After Cassie finds Edric’s brother and earns his trust, Edric’s arch-rival hires her to infiltrate his company. Cassie agrees but knows that she’s not exactly the desk-job type so she gets her sister, Ellie, to work for Edric’s company as a mole. Ellie and Edric start to become friends and then she develops romantic feelings for him. It gets a little complicated, needless to say, since the only reason Ellie knows Edric is because she’s sent to spy on his company. I won’t say anymore because I don’t want to spoil things.

The book’s mostly about the characters—Ellie, Edric, and Cassie. They develop a lot during the story and their relationships with each other change.

 What are the most challenging aspects of being a writer? And the most rewarding?

 The most challenging aspect of being a writer, for me, is time budgeting. I’m a law student as well as an author. I spend probably about 40 hours a week doing legal things (attending class and studying in the school year and clerking at prosecution offices in the summer) and then I try to write an additional thirty hours a week and then I spend Molly 3about five hours a week marketing and such. I love writing and I need to actively make a point to budget work and family to make time for it. So far I’ve been rather successful. But that’s probably the most challenging part.

The most rewarding part is bringing my characters to life and telling a story. It may sound silly but Edric, Ellie, and Cassie sort of became real to me throughout this process of writing the book. It’s fun. Writing is a reward in and of itself.

 

What is your top tip for an aspiring writer?

 Make writing fun for you. If it becomes a chore, then you’re not going to want to write and your book either (a) won’t get finished, or (b) the book will reflect that you don’t enjoy making it. If you love your book, it’ll almost write itself. Sure, there are some times when it does feel like a chore (like editing can be tedious), but overall it should be fun for you to create your own story and get to know your characters.

I have a little routine when I write. It sounds odd but I like to write while I watch television with my husband. It’s become a nightly ritual so I look at writing as my way of unwinding through the day. I look forward to writing every night. Granted, multitasking isn’t for everyone but the main point is to make writing fun for you.

What are you working on at the moment?

Right now I’m working on another romance novel. I’m thinking that it’s going to be called “Mel and the Mob” but that title is subject to change. I wrote it before under a pseudonym a while ago but I’m re-writing it now because I want to totally change the plot and change some things about the characters. The protagonist, Mel, is a lawyer, actually. (Not the type of law I’m going into.) It’s going to involve lawyers, the mob, a pharmaceutical company, and a handsome chemist/CEO. It’s going to be a fun book; I love the characters. (In case you can’t tell from the umpteen million times I’ve mentioned characters, I have a thing about characters, haha!)

What do you like to read?

 Right now I spend most of my time reading court cases because of that whole law school thing I have going on. When I’m not reading legal stuff, I like to read contemporary romance novels (surprise, surprise). My favourite novel is A Woman of Substance by Barbara Taylor Bradford.

Where can readers find you?

 I actually made a website! It’s mollyvlovell.com (easy to remember because my name is Molly V. Lovell). I’m also on Facebook, @MollyVictoriaLovell, Twitter, @MollyVLovell, and Instagram @Mollsie18.

My book will be available on Amazon come August 25.

Here’s my Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0746PHKR1/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500933827&sr=8-1&keywords=a+sibling%27s+dilemma

Here’s my Goodreads link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35714147-a-sibling-s-dilemma?from_search=true

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