Category Archives: Fantasy

Want to win a book?

Announcement posterToday I am passing my blog to Solstice Publishing who are running a give-away competition to promote one of their latest anthologies  I don’t have a story in it myself as I have been busy on my own collection of Shakespeare themed stories, Cast Off, which Solstice will be publishing later in the summer. But I know many of the authors through the Solstice ‘family.’

ENTER TO WIN! That’s all you have to do. We at Solstice Publishing are celebrating Plots & Schemes Vol. 1 becoming a best seller in Germany during its release by giving away three autographed copies of the print edition of this fabulous anthology.

https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/237966-plots-schemes-vol-1

All you have to do is click on the Goodreads link between May 26 and June 9 and enter. It’s that simple. Once the contest ends, Goodreads will notify us of the winners names and you will receive your copy.

Her child vanishes in a puff of smoke …

When Murder is on the Itinerary …

An eavesdropped comment leads to an impossible scheme …

Mysterious events pull Dana into danger …

A rock star’s murder leaves Emlyn Goode questioning everything she knows about herself …

Murder most foul puts this cop to the test …

One murder, one plan, two possible outcomes …

Losing your mind is scary …

If you’re not at the beach, the Tough Luck stories will take you there …

Trail Town Texas leans heavily on their sheriff …

Murder, kidnapping, mysterious events, and more are our treat to you in this wonderfulFacebook and Twitter post 11 (1) anthology from Solstice Publishing. Discover the talents of K.C. Sprayberry, Debbie De Louise, Donna Alice Patton, E.B. Sullivan, Susan Lynn Solomon, Johnny Gunn, K.A. Meng, Leah Hamrick, Lois Crockett, and Stephy Smith.

https://bookgoodies.com/a/B072L7KZ6K

Here’s a little taste of what you’ll find inside this intriguing book!

A smile was on his face. Despite the fact that he was supposed to connect with the egg donor of this lovely child, he had no thoughts of doing that or returning the kid at the appointed time. His timing was perfect. The child—Lanie is such an idiotic name; I’ll have to come up with another one—would be five in a few days. In time, she would forget there had been his loser ex in her life. She—Sheila will regret divorcing me—had battered through his training, all he’d gone through to make her a compliant and complacent wife. She’d run away after he ordered her to get an abortion.

Good thing the bitch ignored me. I wouldn’t have this gorgeous child to raise to be like me.

Granted the child was weak now, but he would fix that, as soon as he made sure they vanished forever. No one would stop him from raising his daughter as he saw fit, and that meant keeping her away from her weakling of a mother.

Quietly, Mark Jannson, scion of the globally famous Jannson family, whose assets numbered in the billions, removed anything he considered important from his lavishly furnished thirty room mansion located in the mountains above Denver. His mother’s jewels were carefully packed into a leather satchel, to be given to his daughter, if she remained true to the Jannson name. The woman who called herself his mother had been consigned to a hovel in the southeast somewhere, once she showed her true colors by attempting to take him from his father.

“Let the bitch live in poverty the rest of her life,” he whispered.

https://youtu.be/3xUn1SZZrF8

Starting May 26, 2017, simply click on the link provided and enter. If you aren’t a member of Goodreads, you can join easily. This is a great place to discover books by new and exciting authors and be in on the fun of all sorts of entertainment!

solstice logo (1)

Meet Author David A Wilson

On my blog today is children’s author, and dragon dreamer, David A Wilson. Like me, David lives in Coventry, UK, and is a member of the Coventry Writers’ Group.David Wilson

What is the title of your recent book? (In a nutshell what is it about?)

 Aaron Gray and the Dragon War is a book about an extremely bratty kid called Aaron who says “Crud” a lot. He lives in a children’s care home and has the same dream every night about dragons fighting each other around a castle. One day he gets sucked into the dragons’ world and is sent on a quest with another kid called Julia to try and stop a dragon war.  Julia’s generally quite thrilled about the whole thing. Aaron isn’t.

 What are the most challenging aspects of being a writer? And the most rewarding?

 It turns out that there are rules about when to use commas and exclamation marks. No matter how hard I try I never get it right and have to kill off all punctuation mistakes when editing. Sometimes I let a few stay in out of pity. The most rewarding part is that I have this whole world of characters and fantasy creatures that I get to explore. I’ve especially grown fond of Aaron and can’t wait to send him on more adventures in the future.

 Tell us a bit about everything you needed to do to get your book published – and launched. What worked? What you wouldn’t do again?

David Wilson 2Well Aaron Gray is self-published, rather than going through a publisher who already knows what they’re doing. The steps are all still the same, but it’s me doing them all rather than clever people in an office somewhere. I had to find my own editors to critique my book and find any errors, then find a printer and distributer, then find someone to design the cover because my art skills are shocking,  then format the book for printing and for e-books, then market the book myself and approach booksellers. Oh and before all that I had to write the book too.

My main piece of advice would be to give yourself plenty of time between your final book edit and publication. Getting books printed takes time, and every time you contact someone like Waterstones there’s a 30 working day (6 week) wait before you get a reply. You also need to take time to plan your book launch and contact your local media. I tried to do all of this in about 6 weeks, which as you can imagine posed some problems!

 What is your top tip for an aspiring writer?

 Decide what you want to write and write it. Don’t stop because it’s rubbish. First drafts are supposed to be rubbish. Don’t even stop and edit what you’ve written before. Just write whatever you need to write until your story’s finished. Then give yourself a week or so, go back to your story and start to craft it into something special.

 What are you working on at the moment?

 Book two! Aaron Gray and the <cough cough cough> is all plotted out and I’m hoping to have the first draft finished by the end of May.

 What do you like to read?

 I have a ridiculously  strict reading regimen, making sure that I’ve read one book in each of the following four genres before returning to the top of the list.

  • A children’s/YA book (because that’s my genre)
  • A christian/spritual book (good for the soul)
  • A book that is considered a classic (because there are so many amazing books I haven’t read)
  • A book recommended by a book club (to see what’s currently popular)

Where can readers find you (Amazon links etc)?

 The easiest thing to do is check out my website at www.breveny.co.uk, which has links to all the various bookstores and new content three times each week. You can also find me on facebook at www.facebook.com/breveny .

 

 

 

 

Capturing a child’s view of the world

Happy ‘Everybody Reads YA’ #SundayBlogShare

Today, to be a little bit different, I’m sharing an excerpt from Penelope Lively’s memoir of her childhood growing up in Egypt, Oleander Jacaranda. In chapter three she recounts a number of her very first memories, noting how surreal and disconnected, what she calls this ‘assemblage of slides in the head,’ is. At the time of writing the memoir she could not work out the chronology for when each event occurred, and noted how important it is, to an adult mind, to understand things in a linear and sequential way. Not so for a small child.

Excerpt:

It is only very small children who retain this wonderfully surreal vision. It is an anarchic vision, too. They are seeing the world without preconceptions or expectations, and therefore anything is possible. [Unlike adult perceptions] The child’s view arises because of an absence of expectation, not a manipulation of what is known.

Her insight into how children see the world is, I feel, a useful guide for any writer trying to get into the head of a small child, or someone who, for whatever reason, can not think like a ‘normal’ teenager or adult – think of Mark Haddon’s novel written from the perspective of an autistic boy. The nearest I have got to capturing the child’s ‘anarchic’ view is in my short story for young teenagers, Sleeping Beauty. Here the young heroine is in a coma and sees things in a more surreal and fantastical way than the adults around her do, or she would if she were fully conscious. Children don’t understand the world as adults do. But how they make sense of what they see and experience, is sometimes more real.

Links:

sleeping beauty

 

Sleeping Beauty : myBook.to/TheSleepingBeauty

http://bookgoodies.com/a/B01CKKNG7Q

http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B00RVO1BHO

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00RVO1BHO

A short YA read for Sunday.

Happy ‘Everybody Reads YA’ #SundayBlogShare. Today I am sharing an excerpt from Sleeping First LoveBeauty. This is a short story that combines fairy tales, fantasy, hospital drama, and a teenage girl’s first feelings of love. The story can be bought as a stand alone e-book, and is also one of the stories in the anthology First Love, published by Summer Solstice.

Excerpt:

It seemed a funny idea of a quest to me, and Mum never got round to telling me this story, or teaching me to read properly. She got sick and died, and all I had left to remember her by was a head full of fairy tales and the recollection of her scent: l’air du temps, according to the label I eventually learnt to read. The scent still clung faintly to her dresses and a coat that Dad had hidden in the back of my wardrobe when Sukie moved in. Sometimes I would sit in my wardrobe and pull the door close, just to breath in the memories of a happier, safer, time.

Blurb:
sleeping beauty

Dawn has been in a coma for a year and is visited in hospital every day by her devoted father, occasionally by the ghost of her dead mother, and once by her vicious stepmother. Unable to move a muscle she monitors their coming and going and relives the events that lead to her accident. She yearns to wake up and live like a teenager again, but nothing so far has been able to rouse her from her deep, deep sleep. Then, on her fourteenth birthday she is visited by a mysterious delivery boy with a strange package.

 

Links:

First Love Anthologyhttp://bookgoodies.com/a/B01BH43NXS

 Sleeping Beauty:   http://bookgoodies.com/a/B01CKKNG7Q

myBook.to/TheSleepingBeauty

 

 

Homophones and Homonyms

Do you know your homophones from your homonyms? Yesterday I was relocating a book on the history of English spelling that I had bought as a student. It had been written by my tutor, David Scragg, and I had hoped that buying it might improve my grades. It didn’t – though I suppose actually reading it would have helped!

Tucked in the book was an article from a newspaper. I’m not sure which one, or the date it was published. It was written by Charles Lewis, a barrister with an interest in language. His particular interest was the ambiguities in English and the problems this can cause ordinary folk, let alone lawyers.

His discussion of homophones and homonyms brought back memories of lecture halls in the ’70s that managed to be simultaneously  stuffy and drafty, and fellow students who managed to snooze peacefully through lectures on the more arcane areas of English grammar despite the uncomfortable wooden benches.

But the two ‘H’ words are quite fun. The examples given below may not work for all English speakers because we use different dialects, but you can probably think of your own word pairings that would.

Homophones are words that are pronounced in the same way, but are spelled differently, like Rome and roam, or horse and hoarse, or wade and weighed, see or sea. Teas / tease / tees. Rain /rein / reign. Homophones are words that sound the same, but come from different language roots (Anglo-Saxon / Latin / Greek etc.)

Homonyms, on the other hand, have the same spelling and pronunciation, but mean completely different things.  For example:  seal – the animal, and seal – the means of closing something; lock – hair or bolt; mine – colliery, or possessive; saw – tool, or past of the verb to see; see, the verb and see, a bishop’s area of responsibility. Again homonyms have come into common usage via different language roots.

There are also a whole pile of words that have the same spelling, but are pronounced differently: tear, wind, does. Lewis called these biphones.

A few words can fit all categories. One such is ‘row.’

  • Homophone – row (your boat) / roe (fish eggs)
  • Homonym – row (your boat) / row (of beans)
  • Biphone – row (your boat) / row (argument).

the-ghost-queen-001If you have enjoyed this article, and would like to find out more about my work, go to the Published
work page on this blog, or my Amazon Author pages.

My most recent work is a short story, The Ghost Queen. It is based  on Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale, and is part of my Shakespeare’s women project. It is published by Solstice.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B00RVO1BHO

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00RVO1BHO

myBook.to/GhostQueen

 

 

Everybody Reads YA

Welcome to ‘Everybody Reads YA’ #SundayBlogShare.

Today I’m sharing an excerpt from a short story loosely based on Shakespeare’s Hamlet. A young girl is sent from her happy home and family to fulfill her father’s dying wish that she should marry a distant cousin and thereby save the family estate as a home for her mother and younger sisters. Unfortunately, when she arrives at her destination, it is her intended husband’s younger brother who first attracts her attention. The story is called Journey to the Fair Mountain.

Excerpt:

He had deep blue eyes and gave me a lingering smile as he held my hand. I felt a tremor Journey to the Fair Mountainpass through me that was more than just the cold. He held my hand tighter and put it to his lips, but the trembling did not stop, even as I curtseyed.
“Your hand is frozen,” he said, stroking it gently, and looking straight into my eyes. “It must have been a hard journey through the snow.” I nodded, and bit my lip to stop it quivering as I lowered my eyes, shy and awkward under his probing gaze, too awed to say we had had no snow that day. Was this the one? My future husband? And was it really less than a week since I left my own home? It felt such a long, long time ago.

william_shakespeares_first_folio_1623

 

Journey to the Fair Mountain is one of a number of short stories based on Shakespeare’s heroine’s activities off stage that I have been writing. A  number have already been published in anthologies and as stand alone e-books, and are available from Solstice Publishing, or from my author page on Amazon Books.

 

 

 

Links: 

Journey to the Fair Mountain:                                                                                                 http://bookgoodies.com/a/B019CULSW2                                myBook.to/JourneyToTheFairMountain

A Midsummer Day’s Dream: myBook.to/MidsummerDaysDream          http://bookgoodies.com/a/B01I0CB1WU

The Ghost Queen: myBook.to/GhostQueen

Chains of Magic: http://bookgoodies.com/a/B00YYKOOLS                       myBook.to/ChainsOfMagic

 

 

 

Author – K. C. Sprayberry – launches a new book.

Today I’m handing over my blog to K. C. Sprayberry who is not only a prolific writer, but also editor in chief with Solstice Publishing. She knows the score from both sides! She launches a new book on Friday 9th December.

kathi-banner-1

Welcome to the Canoples Investigations Exposes Space Dodger release tour. This is the third novel and fourth story in this series. Strap on your restraints and be ready for an exciting ride… oh, once you have the book in hand, you will discover there’s a special added attraction—the first chapter of Secret Society: A Canoples Investigations Novella!

http://bookgoodies.com/a/B01N0OBRS6

kathi-bd-quoteBlurb

There’s a carnival on the station, with all kinds of “legally” cloned animals, more than a few zero-G acrobats, and miniature clowns. BD’s ever present suspicious mind latches onto one thing when the advance team for Galactic Carnival arrives to begin preparations for a weeklong visit. The ringmaster looks familiar, but the man swears that he has never been to Canoples Station before. Even worse, children five and under are disappearing. A bit of investigating on BD’s part clues him in to the fact this has happened on every station Galactic Carnival has visited so far. He’s determined to uncover the true identity of the ringmaster and solve the mystery of the missing children, but at what cost. Is BD willing to lose his lifelong friends to solve this case? Will they prove Jenna Rock, Wade’s girlfriend, isn’t involved?

About K.C. Sprayberry

Born and raised in Southern California’s Los Angeles basin, K.C. Sprayberry spent years traveling the United States and Europe while in the Air Force before settling in northwest Georgia. A new empty nester with her husband of more than twenty years, she spends her days figuring out new ways to torment her characters and coming up with innovative tales from the South and beyond.

She’s a multi-genre author who comes up with ideas from the strangest sources. Those who know her best will tell you that nothing is safe or sacred when she is observing real life. In fact, she considers any situation she witnesses as fair game when plotting a new story.

Excerpt

Sure the space pirates were trouble, but we conquered them. Erin Markus and her splifters kathi-space-dodgers-001-2gave us a few heart-thumping moments, but all of them are now in custody. Even the trial between those incidents wasn’t really hard. This… this situation unfolding in front of us promises to be the toughest problem we’ve ever faced so far, and I refuse to ignore it, despite my buds urging me to back off.

“That’s Dr. Janos Markus,” I say. “Look at him. Not the weird makeup. Not the freaky hair. Look at the structure of his face.” I stare space bolts at Carl. “Check out the shape and color of his eyes.” My gaze lands on Terry. “You can’t tell me that man isn’t related to Erin Markus.”

Both of them turn their heads toward our quarry. Their expressions indicate they’re doing as I asked. Carl looks doubtful, shaking his head several times and muttering that it might be true, although he isn’t sure. Terry appears bored, almost half asleep, yet the tension in his muscles indicates he’s catching on to what I’ve pointed out.

“You may be right,” Terry says quietly. “But we need real proof. We need to compare his likeness to one of Dr. Markus. We need actual images of Space Dodger to prove this man is an imposter.” He faces me. “BD, we can’t just leap to conclusions. Not anymore. We promised Chief Pelham that we would go by the rules.”

There it is again. That whole rule thing. Like that has worked for us in the past. I snort in disgust.

Interview with the Author

What book for you has been the easiest to write? The hardest? The most fun?

The Canoples Investigations series has been the easiest to write. Once I have the plot for each story settled, it all comes together and can be finished in about four to five marathon sessions.

The hardest? I’d have to say a short story I just finished, Two Hearts One Soul. The characters were alive in my head. Their story was there, but bringing it all together took a monumental effort.

The most fun are the Ghosties books. Ah, I see you were thinking I’d say the Canoples Investigations books, but Hailey and her group in the Ghosties stories are silly but dedicated. Their adventures make people laugh. I have a lot of fun writing those.
Which comes first, the story, the characters or the setting? What are the elements of a great book for you?

The characters always come first. They decide what the story will be and were it will be set. The fine points often come later, but those characters are always in control of the story.

What is the hardest part of writing/the easiest for you?

Figuring out which story to work on when they’re all screaming for attention. I can’t do a bit here and a bit there. Once I start on a story, I have to follow it through to the end. That can be very frustrating when characters are yelling “Me, me, me” while I’m trying to move through a difficult plot point in another story.

https://youtu.be/eZgtik2flEM

Interview with BD Bradford

What do you consider the most overrated virtue?

That Dads are supposed to care about their kids. Most do, I’m not knocking them. But there are some who only think about themselves. They don’t care what happens to their families or how everyone has to live with their bad choices, just that they’re going to have fun and take what they want.

On what occasions do you lie?

I don’t lie… well, not much and only when it’s necessary to get the job done. But I always get caught, so I work really hard at not lying.

Which words or phrases do you most overuse?

Pluto gas—glances in all directions—man, don’t let my mom know I said that. It’s a swear word and I will be in huge, major, the biggest trouble in the galaxy if she ever knows I said that word. Yeah, by intergalactic law, I’m an adult, but have you ever told your mom that?

 Social Media Links

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/K.C.SprayberryAuthor/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/kcsowriter

Blog: http://outofcontrolcharacters.blogspot.com/

Website: www.kcsprayberry.com

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5011219.K_C_Sprayberry

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005DI1YOU

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+KcSprayberry/posts

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/kcsprayberry/boards/

Manic Readers: http://www.manicreaders.com/KCSprayberry/

AUTHORSdB: http://authorsdb.com/authors-directory/5230-k-c-sprayberry